Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Tasmania’s South


After Our visit to the Tasman Peninsula we drove to Hobart for supplies/laundry/internet.  While In Hobart we visited the Museum of Old and New Art (MONA).  MONA is a world class museum with everything from classical paintings and early Japanese Art to modern pieces by contemporary Australian artists. Definitely worth a visit, just plan on taking half a day to explore it fully. 
The directors parking spot should give you a rough idea of their management philosophy. They both drove Tesla electric cars.
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After a brief visit to Hobart we drove back to the east coast to ferry to Bruny Island.  
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Here is some ruins of an abandoned logging camp.  This was the winch used to pull huge trunks up the hill side for rough milling.  The steam pistons made 14 horsepower!  All the trees you see around the equipment have grown in the 40 years since the camp was closed.  This mountain was logged for almost 100 years, the majority of its timber was used in boat constructions.
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Here is the boiler. 
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After we returned from bruny we visited a local in the Huon valley.  While we enjoyed the view from his balcony and uploaded photos, we also got to watch several wooden sailing vessels in the river.  Very relaxing, I can see why people move here from the mainland.


We continued south from the Huon valley to the southern coast. At the end of the road (literally), we left the van, and continued  on foot.  This is the southernmost point in Australia.

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From there we trekked south through the bush to the cape.
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About 2,000 miles that way lies Antarctica.  The surf was intense, as the waves born in the gales of the roaring 40s crashed against the beach.  Often there were 6 or more rows of rolling breakers coming in simultaneously.  
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Some track workers has just finished replacing the long stair that lead to the campground here.  Being so remote means that most track work in Australia is done with helicopters.  Workers are airlifted in as well as materials.  They live on the track until the work is done, then they are flown out.
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Most of Tasmania’s southwest is a vast wilderness area accessible only by foot or air. The  South Cape Bay you saw above is the endpoint of the southern coast track.  Most people walking this 7 day track are flown into the start point, and walk their way out.

2 comments:

  1. Your documentation is awesome I feel like I am right there with you..with all those cherished memories...XOXO Aunt Nancy

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    1. That is what we are hoping for! Love you too!

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